Archive for the 'Hounds' Category

Your Greyhounds Unique Diet

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Choosing the right food for your greyhound isn’t easy. Supermarkets seem to be piled full of regular pet food but the right nutritionally healthy greyhound dog food tends to be tough to locate. Nevertheless, before you take the cheaper pet food in stock you ought to know that your greyhound has got completely different nutritionary requirements when compared with that of other dogs. They require a good quality eating routine that fits his or her distinct requirements.

Greyhound keepers all undoubtedly love their own dogs, yet you will encounter many who disagree about which food is the best for this kind of breed. Ultimately it is up to you to make a decision exactly what is the best for your pet, but using a little research you will start to recognize the sorts of foods your greyhound needs in his or her eating routine.

If at all possible, a greyhound needs to be feeding on a certain amount of healthy proteins from every bowl of food. A high quality pet food intended for mature canines will generally contain close to twenty percent protein. But bear in mind, this is excessive for the greyhound since they need to have close to seventeen percent protein. The fat level ought to be about 8% together with approximately three percent carbohydrates. Through serving a good nourishing, balanced diet regime the greyhound should have very good energy levels along with a smooth coat and vibrant eyes.

In case you have an active racing greyhound then you must uncover a brand of greyhound food with greater levels of protein. This is because a powerful athletic, active greyhound will probably use up large sums of energy. They might have to have up to 30% protein in their food.

Regardless of whether your own greyhound is no longer racing or active he will need regular physical exercise to keep him in good condition. Don’t forget in winter months that your greyhound will benefit from wearing a padded natural cotton jacket to help keep him comfortable and his body’s temperature at a constant degree.

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robbie on September 20th 2010 in Dog Ownership, Hounds, dog food

Hounds Breed Overview

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Some of the oldest dog breeds in the world are amongst the hound group, e.g. some evidence can be found in Egypt in the tomb of the pharaohs.  Most hounds were originally used for their hunting instincts either by sight or scent.  Beyond this, it is difficult to find generalisations amongst the breed as there are quite a mix of sizes (from the giant Irish Wolfhound to the small Dachshund), coat types and attitudes.

The Hound Group can be divided in two groups:

- The Sight Hound group i.e. Saluki, Afghan, Borzoi, Pharaoh Hounds, Basenji, Deerhound, Otterhound, Whippet and Elkhound which are believed to date back to 5000 BC.

Saluki

Saluki

Sight Hounds possess a lean, powerfull body with a deep chest and long legs which give them both speed and a phenomenal gift of stamina.  They also have exceptional eyesight, this combined with the speed and stamina are what make them so efficient at catching the intended prey once spotted.  Typical examples of sight hounds are the Whippet and Greyhound.  Using these strong characteristics they can be used for racing or hare coursing.  Others in the group can be described as proud and aloof nevertheless they can make trustworthy companions.  They all will require a significant amount of exercise.

Scent Hound group i.e. Bloodhound, Dachshund, Beagles, Foxhound, Rhodesian Ridgeback and various Basset Hounds.

Scent Hounds rely strongly on the sense of smell to follow the trail of a prey, such as the Bloodhound, quite literally follow their noses.  Eyesight and speed is of less importance.

Only second to the Bloodhound, the Basset Hounds are specially good at scent tracking, and due to this very strong instinct could easily wander off following their nose if they are left unattended in an open space.  Early training of walking on the lead is strongly recommended as they can have a one track mind when following an interesting scent, and will pull you in all directions.
Scent Hounds are friendly and social; many have been bred to hunt in packs and therefore enjoy the company of other dogs.

Basset Hounds

Basset Hounds

After many thousands of years of breeding, and valued for their independence of thought, the breed is generally not the easiest to train; the Afghan which a very independent spirit being the most challenging with the Ridgeback being the most obedient in the group.  Nevertheless they can make good family dogs and can get along with other family pets, however some might be tempted to chase the neighbour’s cat.

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Claudie on November 23rd 2009 in Hounds